Mar 3 2011

I’m scared… [day 281]

…of toilets.  Yes, it’s true.  I cannot bring myself to fix one of these when it breaks.  This fear stems from my childhood.

When I was about 8, we lived in a house that had 1.5 bathrooms.  My mom, being the neat freak that she was, only allowed us to use one of the bathrooms.  The other bathroom got used so rarely that the toilet water evaporated and there was always a ring around where the water had been.  You could count the rings, similar to telling the age of a tree, but there rings being measured in days, not years.  The main toilet was having problems, so my parents showed me how to fix it, just in case it happened when they weren’t home.  My, how times have changed!  Home alone.

If the toilet kept running, I was to jiggle the handle.  If that didn’t work, I was to remove the top and jiggle the little white thing.  Seemed simple enough.  Even at that age, my dad had to hide his tools because I would build stuff out of anything I could get my hands on.  So, of course, I came home from school one day, used the bathroom and the toilet kept running water.  I jiggled the handle, waited, knowing good and well that I would eventually have to remove the lid.  Yes, lid time.  I took it off, jiggled the white thing, and in seconds I had a 3 foot geiser going.

I panicked.  There were no instructions for this disaster!!!  All I could think about is how my mom was going to kill me for making a huge mess.  I quickly placed my finger over the spot where the water was coming out.  Then I thought, “Where is all this water going that I’m holding back??”  Look, I was 8 years old people.  A new panic set in at that point.  I let go, ran to the phone and called my friend next door.  She ran over to my house and found me back at the toilet, holding back the water that was probably flooding someone’s house in China.  After two young kids deliberating over something they knew nothing about, my friend ran outside to find some help.  She came back in less than five minutes with some guy she found on the street.  Again, this was a different day and age.  The man came in, turned off the water and quickly left the house.  I lived in a middle class, suburban area and I still wonder, to this day, where that man came from.   Continue reading


Dec 5 2010

if you gotta go, you gotta go [day 193]

We’re at a restaurant and Joe comes back from the restroom, running toward the table, carrying a paper toilet seat cover.  He holds it up and says, “Mom, can you believe this?!  They have paper thing to put on the toilet seats.  How wasteful is that!”  There’s no genetic testing needed to know he’s my child.   Continue reading


Sep 20 2010

toiletries or TOILET trees? [day 117]

Yesterday, I was explaining my no shopping challenge to some friends.  Apparently this was the first time my oldest son has heard the details of this.  The only retail items I can purchase are groceries and toiletries.  He asked, “Why would you buy toilet trees?  They don’t even exist.  Even if they did, why would you want one?”

the toilet tree...

The conversation ended with my other son saying something about my aunts sisters.  (ancestors)


Jul 19 2010

when do you leave? [day 53]

This is a photo story from an abandoned house I visited yesterday.  Yes, sadly, trash society includes houses.  I do love to take photos in abandoned houses, as all of them have an untold story.

It’s like reading a suspenseful book, but being right there in it.

When does it become a good idea to throw away your house?

Oh, the thrill of spotting a potentially abandoned house.  They mystery begins…

What do you leave behind?  Food?

Toys?

Trash?  They must have had some kids like mine.  The trash doesn’t go out until I’ve asked at least 23 times.

Paperwork?

Photos?  This is the most surprising to me.  I have been in many of these houses and the majority of them have family photos left behind.

It makes me happy that they didn’t leave any toilet paper.  :)

Is this the end?  It’s the end of this photo story, but is it the end of throwing away houses?  No.  Many of these houses are structurally sound and with a little work, could be livable.  How could we pair up the homeless population with abandoned houses, without locking them out and calling their habitation ‘squatting’?  I know, it’s a crazy dream, but don’t all dreams start that way?